October 2020

Groin Pain: The Low Back, Hips, and Pelvic Floor

In addition to neck pain and back pain, patients seek chiropractic care for many musculoskeletal conditions, including groin pain. Pain in the groin area can emanate from a myriad of causes from issues involving the reproductive organs, the renal/urinary system, the lymph glands, a pelvic flood disorder, a hip joint condition, and even a lumbar disk herniation. For a patient with groin pain, the first thing a doctor of chiropractic will...

Neck Pain and Upper-Crossed Syndrome

In normal head and neck posture, the center of the shoulder joints are located vertically in line with the bottom of the mastoid processes (the bone just behind the bottom of the ear at the base of the skull) while the muscles on the posterior (or back side) of the cervical spine (neck) act to maintain balance and keep the head back. Sitting at a computer or using a smartphone for...

Short-Term Care for Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

While the primary driver for carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) may sometimes be hormonal changes (hypothyroid, pregnancy, or birth control use), type 2 diabetes, or an inflammatory condition (rheumatoid arthritis, psoriatic arthritis, or gout), many patients’ hand and wrist symptoms are caused by musculoskeletal issues that place pressure on the median nerve or restrict its motion. The good news is that chiropractic care is a great fit for the CTS patient,...

Non-Surgical Care for Shoulder Instability in Young Adults

Shoulder instability (SI) occurs when the soft tissues (joint capsule, ligaments, and labrum) that hold the humerus in the shallow ball-and-socket glenohumeral joint become stretched, torn, or detached. When these tissues are damaged, the resulting shoulder instability is characterized as structural. If instability is caused by abnormal muscle activity that places too much or too little stress on the shoulder joint, the condition is described as functional instability. In teenagers and...

Whiplash and Weakened Neck Muscles

The whiplash process can lead to a number of concurrent symptoms (neck pain, headaches, limited cervical range of motion, etc.) referred to as whiplash associated disorders, or WAD. It’s estimated that about one in five WAD patients will also develop potentially chronic, concussion-like symptoms like brain fog, difficulty concentrating, and other cognitive impairments. A 2020 study shed light on a way to help identify such patients early on so targeted...